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Über dieses Buch

This book shows how companies like Google have reinvented the common practice in management in order to continuously innovate in fast changing industries. With the ever-increasing pace of change, reinventing existing management principles could become a necessity and prove crucial in the long-term competitiveness of many companies. The book presents a unique synthesis of findings from leading research on long-term competitiveness in fast changing industries. The core of the study comprises an exclusive 1-year in-depth research study on the drivers of innovation at Google and includes examples on how Google has translated the reinvented management principles into practice. The book also offers key action-points to help practitioners in reinventing their own management models for continuous innovation.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

1. Introduction

Abstract
The average lifespan of a multinational company is about half that of a natural person. While human life expectancy is growing, however, owing to improved healthcare and better living conditions, the lifespan of companies is getting shorter. This does not have to be the case.
Annika Steiber

A New Set of Management Principles

Frontmatter

2. Management Principles for Continuous Innovation

Abstract
This section is about global changes—why they are bigger, come more often, and are becoming more difficult to predict. It’s also about what companies have done, and are doing, in order to take advantage of the opportunities and avoid the threats embedded in these ever accelerating changes.
Annika Steiber

The Case of Google

Frontmatter

3. Google’s Model for Innovation

Abstract
A search on Amazon in October 2013 for the name Google and the word ‘book’ resulted in more than 20,000 hits. So why read this book? The answer is fairly simple. Few books today discuss Google from the perspective of management models and innovation capabilities.
Annika Steiber

Continuous Innovation: A Critical Business Skill

Frontmatter

4. Managing Continuous Innovation

Abstract
The Pan Am neon sign was a well-known icon of the Manhattan skyline in New York City. For many Americans, Pan American Airways was the national airline. The company started the airline in 1927, but its entrepreneurial roots go much farther back—to the importing of South American guano, bird droppings that could be sold as fertilizer. In 1991, 64 years later, Pan Am declared bankruptcy, and out of the ashes rose a manufacturer of intravenous solutions for the medical sector.
Annika Steiber

Backmatter

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