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Über dieses Buch

This book seeks to provide a comprehensive reconstruction of the 1667 Dalmatia earthquake phenomenon on the basis of eyewitness testimony. At the same time, one of the distinctive features of this book is that the earthquake observations are treated and arranged in time and space so as to provide earthquake data on the macroseismic intensity, which might be used in seismic hazard and risk studies.

On April 6, 1667 a devastating earthquake struck the southernmost region of Dalmatia (Croatia). Most of the affected area at that time belonged to the independent Republic of Ragusa, the capital of which was the town of Ragusa, today Dubrovnik. The 1667 earthquake left behind a lasting scar on the history and life of the Republic, as it was the catalyst of a serious financial crisis. Both the economic and more general consequences of this earthquake have been discussed in historiographical and seismological essays in late 20th-century works.

This book seeks to provide a comprehensive reconstruction of the 1667 Dalmatia earthquake phenomenon on the basis of eyewitness testimony. At the same time, one of the distinctive features of this book is that the earthquake observations are treated and arranged in time and space so as to provide earthquake data on the macroseismic intensity, which might be used in seismic hazard and risk studies.

The book is also intended as an extensive case history, which allows the author to include some guidelines on how to approach the study of a past earthquake and proceed to its full seismological interpretation. In this respect, a unique feature of the book is the comprehensive and detailed analysis of the original documentary sources in their proper context, effectively combining the interpretative approaches of history and seismology.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. On the Eve of the Earthquake

Abstract
The region of Dalmatia, today territory of Croatia, is located in the eastern part of the Adriatic Sea, and stretches from the town of Karlobag (Carlopago in Italian) in the north to Cape Oštro at the tip of the Prevlaka Peninsula in the south. It is a narrow strip of land, dotted by a series of bays, with the Dinaric Alps in the background, and hundreds of islands along the coast. Bordering Dalmatia to the south is the Bay of Kotor (Boka Kotorska, and Bocche di Cattaro in Italian), an area that is today part of Montenegro.
Paola Albini

Chapter 2. The Earthquake Observers

Abstract
Who were the observers of the Great 1667 earthquake? From its very start, the research behind this book focused on finding the answer to this question, by keenly perusing the catalogues of libraries and archives, and going on a quest for the surviving written testimonies of the earthquake’s effects.
Paola Albini

Chapter 3. And the Earth Began to Quake

Abstract
Among the natural phenomena, earthquakes are distinctive, being sudden and brief moments in time that may make their effects felt over a large area, and are seldom forgotten by those who experience them. The latter two comments, of course, depend upon many factors, including the earthquake size.
Paola Albini
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