Skip to main content
main-content

Über dieses Buch

It is said that behind every successful man there stands a devoted and capable woman. The three famous chemists Perkin, Kipping and their collaborator Lapworth married three sisters: Mina, Lily, and Kathleen Holland. The three Holland sisters kept their husbands in close and very productive collaboration throughout their lives, thereby greatly increasing their scientific output. They functioned as a productive scientific family. However, the life and work of the men is thoroughly documented, but little is known about their wives. Professor Eugene G. Rochow, a world-renowned scientist, wrote this biographical historical novel with the help of a grandson, Dr. Brian Kipping. Professor Rochow did not intend to write a bare-bones biography. He took care to make the book factually accurate. Wherever there are no facts, he has not hesitated to flesh out the account with imagination and actual experience of others in order to make the text more readable.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. The Holland Sisters 1888

Abstract
“What is it like, being married to a scientist, Mina? I mean what is it really like in your, ah, special moments together?”, asked Lily, curled up like a kitten on the satin of the sofa. “Is William always so serious? Does he ever unbend, even a little?”
Eugene G. Rochow, Eduard Krahé

Chapter 2. Lily

Abstract
The year 1867 was not a very prominent one in the history of England, or so the public thought at the time. True, there were Fenian outbreaks disturbing the peace in Ireland, and the Government began a rather lackadaisical war in far-off Abyssinia for reasons the man in the street did not understand, nor care about. By and large, the country was in a tranquil mood; an important commercial treaty with Austria had just been completed, adding to the general prosperity of the nation, and in the Midlands the cotton mills were again turning out prodigious quantities of cloth despite earlier worries about the supply of raw cotton from the Colonies on the other side of the Atlantic. Employment was high, and the people were content.
Eugene G. Rochow, Eduard Krahé

Chapter 3. Mina

Abstract
All of us are influenced (and, to some extent, limited) by the region and place where we live. If we feel restricted, we try to ameliorate that restriction; if we feel benefitted, we try to take fullest advantage of that benefit. But no one can ignore his or her surroundings indefinitely; we all come to terms with the region and place where we live, and become a part of it.
Eugene G. Rochow, Eduard Krahé

Chapter 4. Kathleen

Abstract
When Lily was twelve years old, Kathleen, the third sister of “The Sisterhood”, was born on the 1st of June, 1879, in one of the upstairs bedrooms of The Lions on West Quay in Bridgwater, Somerset. She was a rather small child, and occasioned her mother no more than the usual tremendous travail at birth, but her arrival threw the well-organized and rather elaborate household of the Hollands at The Lions into turmoil. The three servants, Susan, Ann and Emma, found their work load doubled; Lily seemed more obstreperous and demanding than usual, and Mrs. Holland was left in a weakened condition from which it took her most of two months to recover.
Eugene G. Rochow, Eduard Krahé

Chapter 5. Moving about

Abstract
After seeing all three Holland sisters married, one might think that “The Sisterhood” had reached a settled state. Far from it! To a young scientist, academic positions are very fluid and changeable; it is in his or her self-interest and also vital to the course of his or her career to seize every opportunity for self-improvement that comes along. When a young person’s work begins to be published steadily in the scientific journals, and so can become known and be judged by persons in authority, if the work has merit it will lead to offers of positions that carry more responsibility, higher prestige, and more income. Any ambitious newcomer will jump at the chance; there will be a great deal of moving about in the early years.
Eugene G. Rochow, Eduard Krahé

Chapter 6. Settling Down. The War Years

Abstract
For Lily and Frederic, the early years at Nottingham were truly a time for fun and living the good life. Right away they enjoyed tennis at the superb courts of the Nottingham Park Club, both in singles and as a pair in mixed doubles. Then Frederic took to golf, a sport he loved and played well; there was at good course nearby at Hollinwell. Lily was slowed down for a time by the birth of their second daughter, Esme, but soon she was ready for the welcome round of plays and operas at the city’s theaters, and they both relished the excellent concerts.
Eugene G. Rochow, Eduard Krahé

Chapter 7. The Postwar Years. The Emergence of Silicones

Abstract
After the Armistice of 1918 the combatant nations found themselves in a greatly altered and rather grim situation. The European nations seemed to be in tatters; their resources and their treasuries were exhausted, and much of their farmland was desolate and unproductive. Furthermore, all of them had huge numbers of returning veterans to care for and rehabilitate. That was the first priority. Existing armories and drill halls were commandeered to serve as demobilization centers and temporary hospitals; new Veterans’ Hospitals were hurriedly built, and women left the armament factories to nurse the wounded and care for the handicapped.
Eugene G. Rochow, Eduard Krahé

Chapter 8. “The Unnecessary War”. Terrible Times

Abstract
In the early and middle nineteen thirties, life in Britain had settled down into a comfortable period of peace and prosperity. The Empire had become the Commonwealth, trade was brisk over the entire world, carried by a new, stronger, and faster merchant marine powered by steam turbines, rather than the old piston engines. The Royal Navy had been rebuilt and expanded to protect the merchant fleet; the new battleships, with their foot-thick armor of nickel-alloy steel and their huge guns set in armored turrets, were indeed dreadnaughts.
Eugene G. Rochow, Eduard Krahé

Chapter 9. War’s End. The Postwar Years

Abstract
The Battle of Britain dragged on, with variations. Tiring of bombing London (that great grey elephant, Winston Churchill called it) with so little effect on the morale of the British people, Hermann Göring decided to switch tactics and obliterate a few cherished historical monuments important to British history. That, he figured, will cut right to their hearts; they value their heritage much more than their miserable dwellings, and they will want to give up this senseless struggle. So he sent hundreds of planes to flatten the city of Coventry and its revered cathedral; destroy it all the way Rome destroyed Carthage, he said. Leave nothing but a flat plain strewn with rubble.
Eugene G. Rochow, Eduard Krahé

Chapter 10. Retirement in Wales

Abstract
Peace and plenty returned very slowly to England and Wales after the end of the war. In fact, rationing persisted long after the signing of the surrender aboard the battleship Missouri in Yokohama Bay, for the country (and indeed the whole world) was in disarray. In the Kipping household, in tiny Criccieth, the retirees accepted the fact with grace and were glad to have their fish and fresh vegetables in summer and their root crops and smoked fish in winter, plus their daily bread and whatever was imported from Canada and the US.
Eugene G. Rochow, Eduard Krahé

Backmatter

Weitere Informationen