Skip to main content
main-content

Über dieses Buch

This book presents an unconventional approach for implementing chipless radiofrequency identification (RFID) systems and related sensors. Contrary to most state-of-the-art chipless-RFID systems, the proposed approach is based on time domain and the tags are read through near field. The book discusses different aspects of these chipless-RFID systems, including tag and reader design, strategies to enhance the data density and capacity, tag programming and erasing, tag implementation in plastic and paper substrates, and synchronous tag reading, among others. A tolerance analysis and validation of the different systems, as well as prospective applications, are also included. The book also offers a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art in chipless-RFID technology, including a comparative analysis, which is extended also to chip-based RFID systems.
Readers are expected to be familiar with RF/microwave engineering technology. Besides master’s and postgraduate students, the book is intended for researchers in the field of radiofrequency identification (RFID) technology, and may be of interest for engineers working in the areas of wireless communications, automatic identification, security, authentication, microwave and wireless sensors, as well as those dealing with internet of things (IoT) and smart systems.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. State-of-the-Art in Chipless-RFID Technology

Abstract
An unconventional approach for the implementation of chipless-RFID systems and related sensors is reported in this book. As it will be shown in Chap. 2, the tags consist of chains of identical resonant elements or inclusions (either functional or inoperative), etched or printed at predefined positions on a dielectric substrate, and tag reading proceeds by time-division multiplexing through near field. In a reading operation, the tag should be mechanically guided above the sensitive part of the reader, a planar microwave structure able to detect (through near-field coupling and sequentially) the functional and inoperative resonators, or inclusions, of the tag, consequently providing the ID code.
Ferran Martín, Cristian Herrojo, Javier Mata-Contreras, Ferran Paredes

Chapter 2. Time-Domain Signature Near-Field Chipless-RFID Systems

Abstract
A different working principle for the implementation of chipless-RFID systems, based on the time domain and near-field coupling between the tag and the reader, is reported and discussed in this chapter. As it will be shown, proximity and proper alignment between the tag and the reader is required for tag reading in such chipless-RFID systems. However, their data storage capacity is only limited by tag size, and it is possible to implement reasonably sized tags with very competitive number of bits, comparable to the number of bits of commercial chipped-RFID systems.
Ferran Martín, Cristian Herrojo, Javier Mata-Contreras, Ferran Paredes

Chapter 3. System Requirements for Industrial Scenarios and Applications

Abstract
In the previous chapter, the working principle and several examples of chipless-RFID systems based on time-domain signature barcodes were reported. It was shown that an unprecedented number of bits (only limited by tag size) is achievable with these systems, at the expense of tag reading by proximity (through near-field coupling with the reader) and proper alignment between the tag and the reader.
Ferran Martín, Cristian Herrojo, Javier Mata-Contreras, Ferran Paredes

Chapter 4. Microwave Rotary Encoders

Abstract
It was shown in Chap. 3 that the relative position and instantaneous velocity between the tag and the reader in a chipless-RFID system based on time-domain signature barcodes can be easily inferred by measuring the time distance between dips, or pulses, in the envelope function. If the system is intended to be applied to motion control (i.e., as linear displacement and velocity sensor), the ID code of the tag must be well known, so that from the space between functional resonant elements or strips in the tag, the tag position and velocity can be determined. As it was discussed in Sect. 3.​6.​3, it is convenient to implement the tag with all-functional inclusions (code ‘111…’), since the spatial resolution (intimately related to the number of pulses in the envelope function) is optimized by considering such ID code. Thus, the angular displacement and velocity of the circular resonator chain (printed or etched in the rotor), relative to the sensitive part of the reader (which acts as stator), can be recorded.
Ferran Martín, Cristian Herrojo, Javier Mata-Contreras, Ferran Paredes

Chapter 5. Concluding Remarks and Future Prospects

Abstract
The main contribution of this book concerns the unconventional time-domain approach for the implementation of chipless-RFID systems and related sensors. In such systems, the tags are electromagnetic encoders consisting of chains of metallic inclusions (resonant elements or strips) printed or etched on a dielectric substrate (rigid or flexible, including plastic and paper). The reader is an element able to detect the presence of functional inclusions in the chain, when the tag is displaced at short distance over the sensitive part of the reader. Thus, in this system, tag reading proceeds by proximity (through near-field coupling) between the tag and the reader, in a time-division multiplexing scheme, where the ID code is inferred bit by bit sequentially [1]. Such ID code is given by the envelope function generated by tag motion in a resonator-loaded transmission line (the sensitive part of the reader) fed by a harmonic (interrogation) signal.
Ferran Martín, Cristian Herrojo, Javier Mata-Contreras, Ferran Paredes
Weitere Informationen