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Über dieses Buch

This book explains the relationships between equality and efficiency, as well as between government and market, in urban-rural and regional development by providing theoretical frameworks and empirical evidence. Urban-rural development in China is understood from a regional perspective, while the core issue of urban-rural and regional development is cross-regional resource reallocation driven by the trends of globalization, marketization and urbanization and their influence on growth and inequality. The book puts forward the following arguments: An urban-rural and regional balance should not be achieved by limiting agglomeration effects in eastern regions. For some time now, China has lacked a suitable mechanism to enable residents in underdeveloped and rural areas to share in the achievements of economic agglomeration. As a result, China should not slow down economic agglomeration and development in eastern regions simply by depending on administrative means to balance urban-rural and regional development. In the final analysis, arriving at a regional balance depends on growth in the eastern regions, provided a reasonable mechanism is implemented to enable inland areas to share in the development achievements of eastern regions. In turn, finding an urban-regional balance rests on urban development, as long as more rural workers can move to and prosper in cities.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
A great developing economy is rising on the Pacific west bank, which is undoubtedly the most important global economic event of the 21st century. The story of China’s rising economy has evolved a specific historical background. The policy of economic opening-up, which originated in the late 1970s in Shenzhen, a small fishing village on the coast of South China, triggered China’s economic transformation and integration into the global economy as a major developing country.
Zhao Chen, Ming Lu

Chapter 2. Urban-Rural Integration and Spatial Agglomeration in the Process of Chinese Urbanization

Abstract
Joseph Stiglitz, winner of the 2001 Nobel Prize in Economics, asserted at the World Bank Conference that urbanization in China and high-tech development in the United States will be the two key factors profoundly influencing human development in the 21st century.
Zhao Chen, Ming Lu

Chapter 3. How Should China Maintain Growth While Balancing Regional Development

Abstract
In the past three decades of the reform and opening-up, China has achieved a sustained and rapid economic growth that has rarely been seen in human history. This has occurred in the context of globalization, industrialization and urbanization. China’s huge population has provided a large quantity of cheap and high-quality labor resources to the global production system and brought considerable market demands when it has fully integrated into economic globalization.
Zhao Chen, Ming Lu

Chapter 4. Globalization and Regional Income Inequality in China

Abstract
China’s recent accession to the WTO is expected to accelerate its integration into the world economy, which aggravates concerns over the impact of globalization on the already rising inter-region income inequality in China. This chapter discusses China’s globalization process and estimates an income generating function, incorporating trade and FDI variables.
Zhao Chen, Ming Lu

Chapter 5. Economic Opening and Domestic Market Integration

Abstract
Does economic opening lead to international as well as domestic market integration? The objective of this chapter is to examine whether China’s policy of opening promotes domestic economic integration.
Zhao Chen, Ming Lu

Chapter 6. Urban-Rural Inequality and Regional Economic Growth in China

Abstract
The East Asian experience shows that fast economic growth could be achieved along with narrowing income inequality, especially for the case of Japan, Korea and Chinese Taiwan. This chapter tries to explore the growth–inequality nexus in China by argues that the conventional approach of data averaging is problematic. It introduces the polynomial inverse lag (PIL) framework so that the impacts of inequality on investment, education, and ultimately on growth can be measured at precisely defined time lags. Combining PIL with simultaneous systems of equations, we analyze the growth–inequality relationship in postreform China, finding that this relationship is nonlinear and is negative irrespective of time horizons.
Zhao Chen, Ming Lu

Chapter 7. Balance Through Agglomeration: A “Third Path” to Balanced Development Between Urban and Rural Areas and Among Regions

Abstract
It seems that China only has two strategies to achieve urban-rural and regional development. One is to balance development with policies biased toward rural and inland areas by restricting land supply in coastal areas and labor transfer to eastern regions. This is considered the path of “balanced development”. The other strategy is to continue to advance economic agglomeration in coastal areas by relaxing control over labor flow and land supply there. This is considered the path of “the pursuit of efficiency”. It is generally believed balanced development and pursuit of efficiency are incompatible methods of achieving balanced development.
Zhao Chen, Ming Lu

Backmatter

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