Skip to main content
main-content

Über dieses Buch

“This is a fascinating, scholarly and informative synthesis of the history of UK community-university engagement and will be essential reading for anyone who wants to make sense of the past in order to progress future agendas in this area. A great read.”—Angie Hart, Academic Director, Community University Partnership Programme, University of Brighton, UK
“This book is pertinent for an in-depth understanding of University-Community partnerships that challenge all European Universities. The notions of engagement, reciprocity or mutuality differ according to the socio-political context, civic traditions and social policies of the European regions. This book is a must read for those who want to make a difference in their Universities and their Communities.”—Maria Vargas-Moniz, President of the European Community Psychology Association.
“Kagan and Diamond’s analysis of University-Community engagement in England, is highly relevant for the challenges facing higher education in many places but particularly in Mexico where higher education has to move from existing verticality and authoritarianism, to become socially more relevant.”—Eduardo Almeida Acosta, Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico.
This book examines and analyses the complex and contradictory relationships between Higher Education Institutions in England and their local communities within a wider political and policy context. It provides an overview of the UK university system which has a long tradition of a mixed pattern of relationships with communities. The book critically explores the academic spheres of teaching and learning, third stream activities and research, showing how the ways in which different initiatives supported by national policy and funding bodies have shaped the relationship universities have with their communities as well as the opportunities and challenges institutions now face to develop and transform these relationships.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Foundations of University–Community Engagement

Abstract
This chapter establishes the foundation for university–community engagement by examining the contested nature of community, and the ways in which universities have developed over time. The discussion goes on to consider the characteristics and principles of engagement and engaged scholarship and the importance of place, in order to end with the question of why engage? The roles of reciprocity and mutuality are argued to be core principles of engagement, which is seen more as an organising process for university activity, rather than a set of discrete activities.
Carolyn Kagan, John Diamond

Chapter 2. The Evolution of University–Community Engagement

Abstract
In this chapter we consider ways in which networks of universities have evolved over time, in relation to community engagement. Different ways of conceptualising community engagement are discussed, ranging from the physical location of universities to engagement through research and taking in the relevance of arts and culture, extension studies, the university presses and service. We argue that university–community engagement is not new but that it has evolved over time as universities adapt to changing social and political circumstances differently across disciplines. Different university clusters are considered and ways in which they have differentiated each other are explored, in order to better understand their shared and distinct features, and move towards a typology of the university facing community engagement.
Carolyn Kagan, John Diamond

Chapter 3. Massification of Higher Education and the Nature of the Student Population

Abstract
This chapter examines some of the policy drivers for community engagement. Policies and practices targeting an increase of diversity in the (often local) student body during a period of massification of higher education are examined with reference to aspects of widening participation. The AimHigher initiative is explored in some detail and progress towards ensuring the student population reflects to wider population are explored. The moves towards lifelong learning with its associated continuing professional development are discussed in the context of meeting community needs for higher education.
Carolyn Kagan, John Diamond

Chapter 4. Marketisation, Teaching, Learning and the Student Experience

Abstract
In this chapter we continue to explore policy developments in relation to students’ experiences of higher education. The need for diversification of programmes of learning and curricular development and delivery, in the face of a more diverse student body is considered. Policy developments in supporting and assessing the quality of teaching in higher education, including the Teaching Excellence Framework are outlined. The emphasis on assessment of the student experience via the National Student Survey and associated policies for student volunteering and ‘employability’ are seen as symptoms of the increasing marketisation of public services and of higher education n particular, which place students as choice-making consumers, a position sometimes inimical to good community engagement.
Carolyn Kagan, John Diamond

Chapter 5. From Knowledge Transfer to Public Engagement

Abstract
This chapter examines the realm of third stream activities and their interface with community engagement. The move from knowledge transfer to knowledge exchange legitimated engagement with communities and not just with businesses. The potential for both Collaborative Awards in Science and Engineering (CASE) studentships and Knowledge Transfer Partnerships (KTPs) to embrace community engagement has been limited. Nevertheless, the shift to monitor community engagement, albeit as a small part of the third stream has legitimised creative ways of working with communities within different initiatives. The promotion of Public Engagement has provided an important and enabling context for community engaged practices, albeit within ever increasing pressures on time in both universities and community organisations, and in the face of a third stream agenda that emphasises economic growth rather than the social good.
Carolyn Kagan, John Diamond

Chapter 6. The Power of Research Quality Assessments in Shaping Research Agendas

Abstract
This chapter overviews ways in which community engagement has been affected by policies about research, themselves dominated by concerns about how to allocate funding for what kinds of research, in the context of the expansion of higher education. Funding has been tied to assessments of quality, and frameworks for assessing research quality have evolved over the years and have distorted research activity in a number of ways. In parallel, policy has both constructed and reflected political and public concerns about value for money and the impact of research. The roles played by academic publishers in advancing a metrics approach to the management of research is reviewed.
Carolyn Kagan, John Diamond

Chapter 7. The Impact Agenda and Beyond

Abstract
In this chapter we explore in more detail the role that the impact agenda might play in advancing university–community engagement. We outline how pathways to impact has become part of the bidding process for research funding and how ‘impact’ now has its own system of recognition and reward. In looking at university–community engagement beyond impact, we foreground the important role that Research Councils play in facilitating and catalysing community-engaged research. In particular the recent cross Council programme of Connected Communities has enabled paradigms of community-engaged work to shine at a time when research priorities for higher education are moving ever closer to Government.
Carolyn Kagan, John Diamond

Chapter 8. Involving the Publics in Research

Abstract
In this final policy chapter we present further examples of policies that have supported community-engaged research, namely those linked to the involvement of the publics in research. Impetus for this is derived from political concerns with the public understanding of science. Over time, this agenda has shifted from communicating scientific results to engaging the public in all aspects of research. Two programmes which have generated a great deal of learning about community engaged research are the beacons for Public Engagement and the Public Engagement with Catalysts programme. Throughout, the question of the extent to which public engagement is community engagement is considered, harking back to earlier chapters reflecting on areas of academic activity.
Carolyn Kagan, John Diamond

Chapter 9. Conclusion: Towards the Reflective University

Abstract
In this chapter we draw out some of the implications of the previous discussions and policy analyses, situating these in contemporary social contexts. We propose that rather than seeing universities as anchor institutions, they are viewed as reflective organisations that are responsive to external agendas and relationships. The current power imbalance that characterises nearly all university–community engagement could be redressed by emphasising, instead, community–university engagement, and supporting the moves towards scholar activism as a model for engagement that celebrates the bringing together of different forms of knowledge to address important social issues.
Carolyn Kagan, John Diamond

Backmatter

Weitere Informationen