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This book investigates the intersection of Indian society, the encoding of post-millennial modernity and ‘ways of seeing’ through the medium of Indian graphic narratives. If seeing in Indian cultures is a mode of knowing then what might we decode and know from the Indian graphic narratives examined here? The book posits that the ‘seeing’ of post-millennial Indian graphic narratives revolves around a visuality of the inauspicious, complemented by narratives of the same. Examining both form and content across nine Indian, post-millennial graphic narratives, this book will appeal to those working in South Asian visual studies, cultural studies and comics-graphic novel studies more broadly.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Publishing Indian Graphic Narratives Post Millennium

Abstract
This chapter surveys the post-millennial context of writing, publishing and reading Indian genre fiction in English, specifically Indian graphic narratives within India. It details the economic and political changes that have led to increased consumerism in the leisure market, which has in turn led to the growth and development of the book publishing industry. Issues of marketing and distribution through both domestic and global publishing houses are presented, with mention of how Indian graphic novels were commissioned (and nurtured) at HarperCollins India, particularly under the editorship of V. K. Karthika. The chapter concludes by discussing the specifics of post-millennial Indian graphic narratives and their invitation to ‘see’ Indianness through difficult or unsavoury depictions.
E. Dawson Varughese

Chapter 2. Modes of Visuality in New India

Abstract
This chapter is particularly interested in the intersection of post-millennial Indian society, the encoding of modernity and ‘ways of seeing’. It begins by considering the twenty-first century and the call to ‘see’ challenging images. The chapter moves on to discuss sacred and secular moments of seeing within Indian cultures and how ‘seeing’ is a mode of ‘knowing’ (following Bhatti and Pinney). The chapter specifically considers a shift in how India is represented and thus ‘seen’ through the medium of Indian graphic narratives and how these narratives usurp erstwhile modes of representing India wherein the auspicious was invoked visually through the artwork (style, colourways, etc.). The chapter concludes by examining how graphic narratives are defined within current scholarship.
E. Dawson Varughese

Chapter 3. Visuality: ‘Seeing’ the Inauspicious

Abstract
This chapter focusses on how India is represented inauspiciously in post-millennial Indian graphic narratives through their exploration and depiction of child abuse, the Emergency in 1970s India, class and caste and (socially) conventional ideas of marriage. In analysing two graphic short stories (‘The Photo’, HUSH), moments from Vishwajyoti Ghosh’s Delhi Calm and moments from two of Sarnath Banerjee’s graphic novels, this chapter considers the visual language of narrating the inauspicious and how, through such topics, established modes of seeing Indianness are usurped.
E. Dawson Varughese

Chapter 4. Identity: Representations of ‘Indianness’

Abstract
This chapter explores representations of Indian identities in post-millennial Indian graphic narratives through their depiction of loyalty and allegiance to a nation, caste and celebrity stardom set to a backdrop of New India. In analysing one graphic short story (Twelve: How it ends), one creative, graphic non-fiction work published by Navayana (Bhimayana), one graphic novel (Kashmir Pending) and one graphic novella by Appupen (Legends of Halahala), this chapter considers the visual language of contested Indian identities and looks at how these various identities are problematised, presented and embodied in the text-image interface of the four modes of graphic representation detailed here.
E. Dawson Varughese

Chapter 5. Conclusions: Decoding Current Lines and Future Spaces

Abstract
This chapter considers the current moment of Indian graphic narrative production and considers what the future might (not) offer for the medium. The chapter also explores what we can know from understanding how inauspiciousness is conveyed in form and content in Indian graphic narratives. A summary of findings from the analyses of Chaps. 3 and 4 of this book appears here.
E. Dawson Varughese

Backmatter

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