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Über dieses Buch

Manage and control Internet-connected devices from Windows and Raspberry Pi. Master the Windows 10 IoT Core application programming interface and feature set to develop Internet of Things applications on the Raspberry Pi using your Windows and .NET programming skills. New in this edition is coverage of enterprise-level tools and features in the Windows 10 IoT Enterprise server operating system, allowing you to manage IoT solutions having large numbers of devices and to deploy applications to enterprise-grade hardware.
Windows 10 for the Internet of Things presents a set of example projects covering a wide range of techniques designed specifically to jump start your own Internet of Things creativity. You'll learn everything you need to know about Windows IoT Core to develop Windows and IoT applications that run on single board computers such as the Raspberry Pi. You’ll learn to develop for the Raspberry PI using native Windows and all the related programming skills that you have built up from developing desktop and mobile applications.
This book provides just the help you need to get started in putting your Windows skills to use in a burgeoning new world of development for small devices that are ubiquitously connected to the Internet.

What You Will LearnKnow Windows 10 on the Raspberry Pi
Read sensor data and control actuators
Connect to and transmit data into the cloudRemotely control your devices from any Windows deviceDevelop IOT applications under Windows using C#, C++, and Visual BasicStore your IOT data in a database for later analysis

Who This Book Is For
Developers and enthusiasts wanting to take their skills in Windows development and connect everyday devices to the Internet by developing for Windows 10 IoT Core. Readers learn to develop in C#, C++, and Visual Basic using Visual Studio, for deployment on devices such as the Raspberry Pi.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. What Is the Internet of Things?

Abstract
Much has been written about the Internet of Things (hence IoT). Some sources are more about promoting IoT as their next big feature; other sources seem to suggest IoT is something everyone needs to learn or be left behind. Fortunately, books and similar media avoid the sales pitch to expand on the science and technology for implementing and managing the data for IoT, while other texts concentrate on the future or the inevitable evolution of our society as we become more connected to the world around us each and every day. However, you need not dive into such tomes or be able to recite rhetoric to get started with the IoT. In fact, through the efforts of many companies, including Microsoft, you can explore the IoT without intensive training or expensive hardware and software.
Charles Bell

Chapter 2. Introducing the Windows 10 IoT Core

Abstract
Windows 10 represents an exciting entry in the IoT arena, giving Windows users a native toolset to experiment with building IoT solutions. While some platforms such as the Arduino are very Windows-friendly, other platforms have forced users to learn about new, sometimes very different, operating systems or tools that are, in contrast to Visual Studio, very challenging to learn. In fact, I’ve heard of some people giving up altogether or not even trying because the operating system and tools seemed too intimidating. All of these became roadblocks for those wanting a familiar and easy-to-use platform to develop IoT solutions.
Charles Bell

Chapter 3. Introducing the Raspberry Pi

Abstract
The Raspberry Pi is one of the latest disruptive devices in recent years that has changed the way that we think about and design embedded solutions and the IoT. In fact, the Raspberry Pi has had tremendous success among hobbyists and enthusiasts. This is partly due to its low cost but also because it is a full-fledged computer running an open source operating system that has a wide audience: Linux.
Charles Bell

Chapter 4. Developing IoT Solutions with Windows 10

Abstract
Microsoft has produced one of the most advanced integrated development environments (IDE) that easily rivals all competition. Indeed, IDEs on other platforms are often compared to Visual Studio for their depth of features, refinement of tools, and breadth of languages supported.
Charles Bell

Chapter 5. Windows 10 IoT Development with C++

Abstract
Now that you have a basic understanding of how to use Visual Studio 2019, you can learn more about some of the languages you may encounter when developing your IoT solutions. One of those languages is C++—a very robust and powerful language that you can use to write very powerful applications. Mastering C++ is not a trivial task and indeed could take someone several years to be fully knowledgeable of all of its features. However, you do not need to achieve a Zen-like harmony with C++ to be able to write applications for Windows 10 IoT Core. You saw this in action in the last chapter. In fact, if you are just getting started programming or know little about C++, all you need to get going is knowledge of the fundamentals of the language and how to use it in Visual Studio.
Charles Bell

Chapter 6. Windows 10 IoT Development with C#

Abstract
Now that you have a basic understanding of how to use Visual Studio 2019, you can learn more about some of the languages you may encounter when developing your IoT solutions. One of those languages is C# (pronounced “see sharp”)—a very robust and powerful object-oriented language that you can use to write managed Windows .NET and UWP applications. Mastering C# is not a trivial task, but it is not quite as challenging as other programming languages.
Charles Bell

Chapter 7. Windows 10 IoT Development with Visual Basic

Abstract
Now that you have a basic understanding of how to use Visual Studio 2019, you can learn more about some of the languages you may encounter when developing your IoT solutions. One of those languages is Visual Basic (sometimes notated as VB)—another robust and powerful object-oriented language that you can use to write managed Windows .NET and UWP applications. Mastering Visual Basic is not as difficult as C++ or C# due to its simplified syntax. However, if you have never seen or worked with any form of Basic programming languages, the code may appear quite different. Fortunately, you need only learn the syntax since Visual Basic can be used to write the same applications as C++ and C#.
Charles Bell

Chapter 8. Electronics for Beginners

Abstract
If you’re new to the IoT or have never worked with electronics, you may be wondering how you’re going to get your ideas for an IoT solution realized. The projects in this book walk you through how to connect the various components used, and thus you can complete them without a lot of additional information or specialized skills.
Charles Bell

Chapter 9. The Adafruit Microsoft IoT Pack for Raspberry Pi

Abstract
When working with electronics projects like those in this book, it is often the case that you have to acquire a host of components and tools in order to get started. The projects so far in this book have minimized the components needed, and I have listed what you need for each project. However, if you want to expand your inventory of components but have little experience with electronics, you may not know what to buy. Fortunately, some vendors such as Adafruit are packaging electronic components, accessories, and even some tools together in a kit, making it simple to get started—you just buy the kit!
Charles Bell

Chapter 10. Project 1: Building an LED Power Meter

Abstract
You’ve seen a lot of examples of powering LEDs—turning them on and off from our IoT device. There are a lot of interesting things you can do with LEDs. For example, have you wondered how a power meter works? If you have used high-end audio equipment, such as a studio sound board, you may have seen a power meter that has several segments ranging from green to yellow to red where green means the level is low, yellow is medium, and red is high. You can duplicate this behavior with a set of LEDs and your IoT device. Yes, you’re going to build a fancy LED power meter!
Charles Bell

Chapter 11. Project 2: Measuring Light

Abstract
The projects that you’ve encountered thus far have used GPIO pins to turn LEDs on or off. But what if you wanted to control the brightness of an LED? Given that you can only turn pins on (high: 3.3V) or off (low: 0V), you have no way to send less power to the LED; the lower the power, the dimmer the LED. If you consider solutions (or features) of devices that are sensitive to ambient light—such as a backlit keyboard—you may have noticed it changes brightness as the room becomes darker. In this project, you’re going to explore how such a feature works. That is, you’re going to build a fancy LED nightlight.
Charles Bell

Chapter 12. Project 3: Using Weather Sensors

Abstract
IoT solutions often employ a number of sensors to observe the world around us, and while you’ve explored a project with a simple sensor, you have yet to see how to work with more sophisticated sensors, such as those available as breakout boards. One of the more popular choices of sensors includes those you use to observe weather. In this case, you’ll start out with a sensor that measures temperature and barometric pressure and calculates the altitude based on sea level pressure. There’s a lot you learn with only those two measurements.
Charles Bell

Chapter 13. Project 4: Using MySQL to Store Data

Abstract
IoT solutions, by definition if not implementation, can generate a lot of data. Indeed, most IoT solutions observe the world in one or often several ways. Those observations generate data at whatever rate the solution specifies (called a sample rate). To make the data most useful for historical or similar analytics, you have to save the data for later processing. Database systems provide a perfect solution for storing IoT data and making it available for later use.
Charles Bell

Chapter 14. Project 5: Remote Control Hardware

Abstract
Some of the more interesting IoT solutions are those that implement actionable devices or features that allow you to control hardware remotely. This could be controlling a remote control toy (car, truck, drone), moving a camera (pan, tilt, zoom), opening or closing a gate, and so forth or simply controlling lights or locks remotely.
Charles Bell

Chapter 15. Azure IoT Solutions: Cloud Services

Abstract
Now that you’ve seen a number of projects ranging from basic to advanced, it is time to discuss how to make your IoT data viewable by others via the cloud. More specifically, you will get a small glimpse at what is possible with the Microsoft Azure cloud computing services and solutions.
Charles Bell

Chapter 16. Azure IoT Solutions: Building an Azure IoT Solution

Abstract
Now that you’ve gotten a taste of what working with Azure is like, let’s put those new skills to work building a real project that uses an IoT device and a sensor to send data to the cloud where we will store and display them. The examples in the last chapter showed how to display the data on the device (or your PC), but we didn’t see any way to save the data.
Charles Bell

Chapter 17. Where to Go from Here?

Abstract
Now that you have had a thorough introduction to using Windows 10 IoT Core, which included the types of projects that you can create, and tutorials, as well as examples in three programming languages, it is time to consider what you can do beyond the pages of this book.
Charles Bell

Backmatter

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