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Über dieses Buch

Over the past several decades, consumer interest in the fine vintage wines produced by small "boutique" vintners across the United States has grown to rival that of many European estates. This attention continues to intensify, especially for the truly good wines that are reasonably priced. Consumers are, however, unforgiving­ especially wine enthusiasts. Second-class wines do not succeed just because a vintner is new. The methods and controls essential to vintners in the production and marketing of top-grade wines have advanced. This second edition of Winemaking has updated and, in some cases, completely revised the material associated with these disciplines. Fine wine is much like other art forms, as it is the infinite variability of factors pertaining to the subject that renders it so complex-and able to attract buyer's attention. Hundreds of different vine varieties are cultivated around the world, and no doubt an even greater number of fruit and berry cultivars. Andwith the addition of such factors as terroir (soil and climate attributes) changing every vintage season, varied vineyard cultivation and harvesting techniques, advancing production technology, dynamic markets, and overall operational philosophy, one can easily understand the enormous breadth and depth of variation that exists. This diversity generates an unimaginable number of different wine possibilities.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. History of Wine in America

Abstract
In comparison to the 6,000 years of wine-growing history in Europe, the 400-year span of American vines and wines seems minuscule. But it should be remembered that most of the major development in the Old World took place during these same four centuries. Few modern-day European wine producers can boast continuous ownership of estate vineyards and cellars since before the 17th century.
Richard P. Vine, Ellen M. Harkness, Sally J. Linton

Chapter 2. Viticulture (Grape Growing)

Abstract
Viticulture is the part of horticulture that deals solely with the growing of Vitis, the vine. A professional grape grower is a viticulturist.
Richard P. Vine, Ellen M. Harkness, Sally J. Linton

Chapter 3. Wine Microbiology

Abstract
Microbiologically speaking, unknown wine is much safer than unknown water. Of the thousands of microorganisms now classified, relatively few have been found growing in wine. This is due to the nearly antiseptic combination of alcohol and acids that occurs in wine. Most microscopic organisms taken from contaminated water actually die if introduced into wine. Human pathogenic organisms cannot survive in the environment of wine. It is because of this phenomenon that wine has promoted human health throughout Western civilization.
Richard P. Vine, Ellen M. Harkness, Sally J. Linton

Chapter 4. Enology (Winemaking)

Abstract
Sooner or later vintners will encounter the term enology, which is sometimes spelled in the British version as oenology. In either case, it is best simplified by its Greek origin of oinos (wine) and logos (logic). Wine logic is based upon the application of analysis, equipment, materials, and technology in designed methodologies to achieve predetermined results. Enology is constructed upon a gastronomic art form, heavily supported by the disciplines of biochemistry, microbiology, and mechanical engineering. A modern-day winemaker is often referred to as an enologist.
Richard P. Vine, Ellen M. Harkness, Sally J. Linton

Chapter 5. Wine Classification

Abstract
Wine experts generally classify wine into five categories, with the distinctions among the classes based primarily upon major differences in their manner of vinification.
Richard P. Vine, Ellen M. Harkness, Sally J. Linton

Chapter 6. Winery Design

Abstract
Many people drawn toward commercial wine production have more rewards in mind than making a profit. A flair for the romantic life or some set of Bacchanalian notions leads them to the idea of starting their own winery. The prospect of realizing such a dream is almost always driven by eagerness: the excitement of awaiting the first set of drawings and the ensuing anxiety to get the structure operational.
Richard P. Vine, Ellen M. Harkness, Sally J. Linton

Chapter 7. Requirements, Restrictions, and Regulations

Abstract
Wine production is regulated by an extensive set of statutes. It is highly recommended that anyone seriously considering starting a winery first obtain a complete set of both federal and state regulations. These should be read, understood, and kept readily available for future reference.
Richard P. Vine, Ellen M. Harkness, Sally J. Linton

Chapter 8. Getting Started

Abstract
The distress of repeatedly making the same mistakes is perhaps only surpassed by the frustration of having made a good wine and forgetting how it was done. It is wise to keep a good price and expense history in the files, and essential to have up-to-date processing and inventory information to supplement records required by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF). All of this obviously indicates that a functional recordkeeping system is essential in operating a successful winery business. A personal computer program, as discussed below and in Chapter 6, is ideal. It may, however, be good education and thrift to start out with manual card files and ledgers in order to fully experience all of the wine production, marketing, and accounting operations in detail before applying computerization. A flowchart for basic recordkeeping is presented in Figure 8-1.
Richard P. Vine, Ellen M. Harkness, Sally J. Linton

Chapter 9. White Table Wines

Abstract
Dry white table wines are easy to make but challenging to make consistently well. They require delicate handling to avoid oxidation (browning) and careful attention to protect and develop delicate flavors throughout formative processing.
Richard P. Vine, Ellen M. Harkness, Sally J. Linton

Chapter 10. Red Table Wines

Abstract
It generally takes more time to bring red wines to the point of bottling than whites. While fermentation should take place in only a week or so and the clarification/stabilization process is relatively simple, the aging of heavy-bodied reds to maturity is more complex.
Richard P. Vine, Ellen M. Harkness, Sally J. Linton

Chapter 11. Blush Table Wines

Abstract
Making pink table wines brings together some elements from both white and red winemaking procedures. Consequently, much of this chapter will make reference back to Chapters 9 and 10.
Richard P. Vine, Ellen M. Harkness, Sally J. Linton

Chapter 12. Fruit and Berry Wines

Abstract
One of the attractive aspects of making fruit and berry wines is that many species ripen during the spring and summer months, well before the vintage season commences for grapes, allowing for more efficiency and variety in the winery facility. The opportunity to add different types of wine to the product portfolio is also an appealing prospect for many vintners.
Richard P. Vine, Ellen M. Harkness, Sally J. Linton

Chapter 13. Marketing

Abstract
Wine marketing encompasses all aspects of the winery at all stages of development. It begins with image development, market research, and development of the marketing plan and marketing budget; continues through the initial sale; and then focuses on consumer retention.
Richard P. Vine, Ellen M. Harkness, Sally J. Linton

Backmatter

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