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Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

1. What is word processing?

Abstract
Well to begin with, it isn’t computing! You don’t need to know anything about programming, or hexadecimal equivalents, or debugging or any of the other things that computer people love to talk about. If anything, it’s an extension of typewriting. A good typist is far more likely to be at home with a word processor than is the most knowledgeable of data-processing managers.
Peter Flewitt

2. Text generation

Abstract
Before the original thought of the executive can be converted by the word processor, it must be presented in some tangible form. This process we will call Text generation. Original material — and we are here concerned only with that which has not been previously generated and stored for re-use — can be produced by only four main methods; longhand draft, shorthand notes, a dictation machine, or direct keyboarding, as shown in Figure 3.
Peter Flewitt

3. What is a word processor?

Abstract
A word processor may be many things to many people. One might as well ask the question, ‘What is a typewriter?’ or ‘What is a photocopier?’ There are many levels of typewriter, from the humble portable to the sophisticated electronic proportional-spacing office machine. There are also many grades of photocopier, from the slow, one-off heat process, semi-domestic machines to the multi-collating, plain-paper copier-duplicators of the huge corporations. One might also ask the question, ‘When does a typewriter become a word processor?’ because the line of demarcation somewhere around the level of electronic and memory typewriters is very hazy indeed! A manufacturer whose main concern is typewriters, but who introduces, at the top of his range, an electronic machine performing some of the functions of editing and memory, might be tempted to call it a word processor. A similar machine, marketed by a company which also produced powerful word- and data-processing equipment at the top of the range, would to them perhaps only merit the description ‘memory typewriter’.
Peter Flewitt

4. What does it do?

Abstract
This chapter and the following one, ‘How does it do it?’ assume a stand-alone configuration consisting of keyboard, VDU displaying 80 characters wide, central processor with floppy disks, and a letter-quality printer. The system is either a dedicated word processor or computer with a ‘user-friendly’ word processing software package. It is not practicable to cope with the many and varied WP packages in great detail, but an attempt has been made to indicate where alternative methods are likely to be used. The intention is to state in broad outline what might be expected from a word processor in terms of functions and ability. The actual operation of the equipment is covered in the next chapter
Peter Flewitt

5. How does it do it?

Abstract
This chapter is about giving instructions or ‘commands’ to a word processor. It sets out the basic principles of command sequences. We then go on to look at a selection of the special function keys which an operator may find in addition to the standard QWERTY layout on her keyboard; some of the codes and symbols which appear on the screen, and different procedures used for filing material on disk.
Peter Flewitt

6. Who can use one?

Abstract
Having now digested quite a lot of information about the hardware, what the equipment consists of, what it does and how it does it, let us now turn to the most important part of the word-processing system — the people who are going to benefit from its use. What kind of a business is going to use this new generation of office aids? It is a common fallacy that only big business can gain from the use of sophisticated equipment. The need for word processors depends on the kind of work which is to be done — not on the size of organisation.
Peter Flewitt

7. Who will operate it?

Abstract
We now come to the most important part of a word processing system — people. No matter how advanced the technology, we are still reliant upon the skill of human beings to make it work. The success or failure of a system depends entirely upon the people who will operate it. Note that I said ‘people’ and not ‘person’, because a word processor does not only involve a girl sitting at a keyboard. The originator also plays an important part. The time will come when all an executive has to do is to pick up a microphone and dictate into it, and the machine will produce perfectly-typed, beautifully set-out hard copy directly from his dictation. When it does — unless standards of dictation are very different from what we experience today — some extremely peculiar letters will result.
Peter Flewitt

8. Where do we go from here?

Abstract
Having completely revised this book, originally written at the end of the 1970s and published in 1980, it seems incredible that in such a fast-moving area as word processing so much that was written at that time is still valid. What has happened of course, is that the basic principles which are what we are concerned with have not changed a great deal. Nor, I think, are they likely to in the foreseeable future.
Peter Flewitt

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