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31-08-2021 | Automotive Engineering | News | Article

Lamborghini Showcases Hybrid Supercar Countach LPI 800-4

Author:
Christiane Köllner
2:30 min reading time

Automobili Lamborghini presents the Countach LPI 800-4: a limited series that pays homage to the Countach. The supercar has a V12 hybrid engine and a system power of almost 600 kW.  

Automobili Lamborghini, in celebration of the Countach's 50th anniversary, has presented the Countach LPI 800-4 at "The Quail: A Motorsports Gathering" in the United States. With a production run of 112 units, the number refers to the internal project designation "LP 112" used during the development of the original Lamborghini Countach. Just under five meters long and not quite 1.20 meters high, the Countach LPI 800-4 will be delivered from the first quarter of 2022.

Characteristic lines

The Countach LPI 800-4 continues the characteristic lines of the five Countach models built over nearly 20 years, with the main line running from front to rear, the sharp angles and lines, and the distinctive wedge shape. The design is clean and simple, with references to the first production versions LP 500 and LP 400. To give the LPI 800-4 the unmistakable face of a Countach, inspiration has been drawn from the Quattrovalvole edition. 

The rear of the Countach LPI 800-4 can be recognized by its characteristic inverted wedge shape. The rear bumper features a low, slim line, and the "hexagonita" design characterizes the three-piece taillights. The LPI 800-4 features the Countach family's signature four tailpipes connected to the carbon fiber rear diffuser. Driver and passenger access is via scissor doors, which were first introduced on the Countach and have become a trademark of Lamborghini's V12 models.

Interior borrows from the original Countach 

The interior also borrows from the original Countach. A central 8.4" HDMI touchscreen, exclusive to the LPI 800-4, manages the car’s controls, including connectivity and Apple CarPlay. It also has a special button called “Stile” (Design): when pressed, it explains the Countach’s design philosophy.

The monocoque chassis and all body panels are in carbon fiber. The Countach LPI 800-4 has a dry weight of 1595 kg, giving it a power-to-weight ratio of 1.95 kg/PS. Visible carbon fiber elements of the exterior can be seen in the front splitter, around the windshield and on the exterior mirrors, as well as on the hood air intakes, sill trim and also on various parts of the interior. Movable air vents have been produced using 3-D printing technology, and a photochromatic roof changes from opaque to transparent at the touch of a button.

The Countach LPI 800-4’s 20" (front) and 21" (rear) wheels feature 1980s dial style styling and are fitted with carbon ceramic brake discs and Pirelli P Zero Corsa tires.

Electric motor supports 6.5-l naturally aspirated V12 engine

With its naturally aspirated V12 engine combined with Lamborghini’s hybrid supercapacitor technology, the Countach LPI 800-4 aims to preserve the experience of the V12 and the sound of its Longitudinale-Posteriore (LP) engine combined with the hybrid technology (I) developed for the Sián. The 6.5-l V12 engine, with an output of around 574 kW (780 PS), is combined with a 48-V electric motor mounted directly on the transmission to deliver another 25 kW (34 PS) or so: This is the Sián architecture, which is a mild hybrid technology that provides a direct link between the electric motor and the wheels, thus preserving the character of the V12 engine. The electric motor is powered by a supercapacitor that delivers three times as much energy as a lithium-ion battery of the same weight.

With a combined maximum output of around 599 kW (814 PS; rounded down to 800 in the name) from the naturally aspirated engine and electric motor and permanent all-wheel drive, the LPI 800-4 achieves acceleration from 0 to 100 km/h in 2.8 s, from 0 to 200 km/h in 8.6 s and a top speed of 355 km/h.

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