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2021 | OriginalPaper | Chapter

Identification of Urban Centres for Conducting Population Census; Need for Combining GIS with Socio-economic Data

Author: Amitabh Kundu

Published in: Sustainable Development Insights from India

Publisher: Springer Singapore

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Abstract

This chapter studies issues involved in the identification of urban centres and determining their boundaries. It takes a critical look at the prevailing procedures of distinguishing urban centres from rural areas (and related terms) and proposes a new approach for areal classification and an operational methodology to address the current deficiencies in the system as followed in South Asian countries in conducting their population Census. An examination of the methodologies used by global institutions for delimiting urban centres’ boundaries and estimating urban population is undertaken including OECD methods, the framework used in World Development Report and the e-Geopolis project. A fourfold criteria for areal classification are proposed. The method proposed is illustrated with a case study of Sri Lanka, comparing results with their official estimates. Integrating GIS technology with socio-economic data, it highlights how existing estimates of urban population would change as a result of the new approach.
Footnotes
1
Buettner (2014) notes that out of these 231 countries, 121 have adopted a single criterion while 84 have used a combination of two or more criteria. Among the single criterion users, 64 countries have adopted purely administrative criteria, 48 have adopted population size/density related criteria while in nine countries, the classification is based on solely urban functional characteristics. Among the combinations, most common is that of administrative and population size/density, followed by population size/density and economic criteria and population and functional characteristics.
 
2
Reza Ali, Haque, Husain and Arif, 2013. “Estimating Urbanisation”, The Urban Gazette, December, 2013.
 
3
“An estimate of 361 places with a population of 5,000 or more that were considered rural in the 1998 Census actually had urban characteristics better than many places considered urban in the Census; if their population is considered urban, this would add another 6.5% to the 1998 urban population of Pakistan” (Arif, 2003).
 
4
This provides the rationale for using the criteria of population density and accessibility to a sizable market for building up an agglomeration index. See World Bank (2009).
 
5
World Bank (2015)
 
Literature
go back to reference Arif, G. M. (2003). Urbanisation in Pakistan: Trends growth and evaluation of the 1998 census. In I. Kemal & Mahmud (Eds.), Population in Pakistan: An analysis of the 1998 population and housing census. Islamabad, PIDE. Arif, G. M. (2003). Urbanisation in Pakistan: Trends growth and evaluation of the 1998 census. In I. Kemal & Mahmud (Eds.), Population in Pakistan: An analysis of the 1998 population and housing census. Islamabad, PIDE.
go back to reference Ali, R., Haque, N., Husain, I., Arif, G. M. (2013, December). Estimating urbanisation. The Urban Gazette. Ali, R., Haque, N., Husain, I., Arif, G. M. (2013, December). Estimating urbanisation. The Urban Gazette.
go back to reference World Bank. (2015): Demographia World Urban Areas (12th ed., 2016). World Bank. (2015): Demographia World Urban Areas (12th ed., 2016).
Metadata
Title
Identification of Urban Centres for Conducting Population Census; Need for Combining GIS with Socio-economic Data
Author
Amitabh Kundu
Copyright Year
2021
Publisher
Springer Singapore
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-33-4830-1_4

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