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About this book

Containing 90+ case studies including BP, Beyoncé, Pizza Hut and Chrysler, this is the first book to analyze brandjacking - when organizations lose control of their brand's image online. Combining crisis communication and social media, this book charts the trend's growth, offering advice to those who find themselves at the mercy of brand pirates.

Table of Contents

Frontmatter

Introduction

Abstract
Brandjacking is the hot new craze that is turning business upside down. Anyone can do it. Jeff Jarvis, a journalist and blogger, did it when he was sold a “lemon” of a Dell laptop and became dissatisfied with Dell’s customer service. He wrote about his experience on his blog and was deluged with emails and comments from people who had had similar experiences. “Dell Hell” became the aggregator of dissatisfied customers who had previously been isolated and may have thought their experiences unrepresentative (CS 4).
Quentin Langley

Chapter 1. Brand and reputation

Abstract
The etymology of the word “brandjack” is obvious — it merges “brand” with “hijack.” But it is worth considering, for a moment, the meaning of the word “brand.”
Quentin Langley

Chapter 2. Issues and crisis management

Abstract
One way to avoid brandjacking is to identify in advance the issues that might cause a problem for you. Sometimes this will be easy but don’t stop with the easy choices. When I joined Shell International in the 1990s, crisis preparedness was heavily focused on exercises around an oil tanker going down. It makes a lot of sense, when you ship more oil around the world than anyone else, to consider what will happen if — or rather when — a tanker goes down. But this is far from the only risk facing a global oil giant. What about a chemical plant exploding? Or some of the real crises Shell has faced concerning a reformulated petroleum that was damaging car engines, the disposal of a North Sea oil storage platform, or the company’s relationship with a brutal dictatorship in Nigeria?
Quentin Langley

Chapter 3. Rise of the machines

Abstract
It is hardly surprising the Internet is having revolutionary consequences. This is the purpose for which it was designed.
Quentin Langley

Chapter 4. The brandjacks

Abstract
To be classified as a brandjack, something needs to be both a crisis. and, specifically, one that plays out significantly in digital media. Some begin in digital media, such as Twitter impersonations. Some, like the fake sign in a McDonald’s window (see CS 70), are then circulated in social media and largely ignored in mainstream media. But the key combination is crisis and digital.
Quentin Langley

Chapter 5. Engagement and transparency: turning your company inside out

Abstract
Brandjacking turns every previous notion of power in the economy upside down. Everyone is a celebrity. Everyone is a VIP. It is not surprising that an organization like Greenpeace can damage your brand, but when an ordinary customer like Dave Carroll or a lone satirist like Josh Simpson can come to dominate the discussion around huge brands like United Airlines or BR the world is clearly changing. Imagine, for a moment, if it had not been Dave Carroll, obscure Canadian folk singer, but Sir Paul McCartney, global superstar, whose guitar had been damaged: “I am terribly sorry, Sir Paul. Allow us to replace your guitar immediately, Sir Paul. And please fly with us, first class, forever, at absolutely no cost, Sir Paul. Please don’t tell anyone we broke your guitar, Sir Paul.” What businesses are only starting to realize is that they are going to have to treat us all like that from now on.
Quentin Langley

Backmatter

Additional information