Skip to main content
main-content

Tipp

Weitere Artikel dieser Ausgabe durch Wischen aufrufen

01.12.2019 | Regular article | Ausgabe 1/2019 Open Access

EPJ Data Science 1/2019

Centrality in modular networks

Zeitschrift:
EPJ Data Science > Ausgabe 1/2019
Autoren:
Zakariya Ghalmane, Mohammed El Hassouni, Chantal Cherifi, Hocine Cherifi
Wichtige Hinweise

Publisher’s Note

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Abstract

Identifying influential nodes in a network is a fundamental issue due to its wide applications, such as accelerating information diffusion or halting virus spreading. Many measures based on the network topology have emerged over the years to identify influential nodes such as Betweenness, Closeness, and Eigenvalue centrality. However, although most real-world networks are made of groups of tightly connected nodes which are sparsely connected with the rest of the network in a so-called modular structure, few measures exploit this property. Recent works have shown that it has a significant effect on the dynamics of networks. In a modular network, a node has two types of influence: a local influence (on the nodes of its community) through its intra-community links and a global influence (on the nodes in other communities) through its inter-community links. Depending on the strength of the community structure, these two components are more or less influential. Based on this idea, we propose to extend all the standard centrality measures defined for networks with no community structure to modular networks. The so-called “Modular centrality” is a two-dimensional vector. Its first component quantifies the local influence of a node in its community while the second component quantifies its global influence on the other communities of the network. In order to illustrate the effectiveness of the Modular centrality extensions, comparison with their scalar counterparts is performed in an epidemic process setting. Simulation results using the Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model on synthetic networks with controlled community structure allows getting a clear idea about the relation between the strength of the community structure and the major type of influence (global/local). Furthermore, experiments on real-world networks demonstrate the merit of this approach.

Unsere Produktempfehlungen

Premium-Abo der Gesellschaft für Informatik

Sie erhalten uneingeschränkten Vollzugriff auf alle acht Fachgebiete von Springer Professional und damit auf über 45.000 Fachbücher und ca. 300 Fachzeitschriften.

Springer Professional "Wirtschaft+Technik"

Online-Abonnement

Mit Springer Professional "Wirtschaft+Technik" erhalten Sie Zugriff auf:

  • über 69.000 Bücher
  • über 500 Zeitschriften

aus folgenden Fachgebieten:

  • Automobil + Motoren
  • Bauwesen + Immobilien
  • Business IT + Informatik
  • Elektrotechnik + Elektronik
  • Energie + Umwelt
  • Finance + Banking
  • Management + Führung
  • Marketing + Vertrieb
  • Maschinenbau + Werkstoffe
  • Versicherung + Risiko

Testen Sie jetzt 30 Tage kostenlos.

Springer Professional "Wirtschaft"

Online-Abonnement

Mit Springer Professional "Wirtschaft" erhalten Sie Zugriff auf:

  • über 58.000 Bücher
  • über 300 Zeitschriften

aus folgenden Fachgebieten:

  • Bauwesen + Immobilien
  • Business IT + Informatik
  • Finance + Banking
  • Management + Führung
  • Marketing + Vertrieb
  • Versicherung + Risiko




Testen Sie jetzt 30 Tage kostenlos.

Weitere Produktempfehlungen anzeigen
Literatur
Über diesen Artikel

Weitere Artikel der Ausgabe 1/2019

EPJ Data Science 1/2019 Zur Ausgabe

Premium Partner

    Bildnachweise