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Über dieses Buch

This open access book presents an overview and step-by-step explanation of process management. It starts with the individual participants’ perspectives on their work in a process and its structuring and harmonization, and then moves on to its specification in a model and how it is embedded in the organizational and IT environment of the company. Lastly, the book examines the joint processing of instances in the resulting socio-technical systems. A corresponding illustration, which expands with the overview, enables readers to gain a comprehensive understanding of business process management.
The book presents various facets of business process management from the perspective of the participants, and introduces a selection of models that have proved useful in practice. The design of such models supports the transition from a more-or-less unstructured or unsatisfactory way of working to a structured process that corresponds to the ideas of the company and its customers. The book is intended for professionals in industry as well as students in the field of business information systems who are looking for guidelines on how to discover, create and implement real-world processes.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Open Access

Chapter 1. Motivation

Abstract
There is no organization without processes. When people want to collaborate, they use the necessary tools and coordinate their activities to reach the desired result. Since such activities can not only be carried out by humans, but also by machines and computers, their activities must also be included when aligning human requirements and technical capabilities. In particular, different types of actors are involved in at least partially automated processes.
Albert Fleischmann, Stefan Oppl, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary

Open Access

Chapter 2. Models

Abstract
In the previous chapter we outlined the various aspects of Business Process Management. Since models are often used in practice to describe these aspects, the following sections will first look in more detail at the tasks and properties of models and modeling. We then present examples of models from various areas of expertise that in our experience have proven helpful in numerous Business Process Management projects. There is no claim to completeness for this exposition, but it can serve as an orientation for the reader when needing to choose description models for individual project needs.
Albert Fleischmann, Stefan Oppl, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary

Open Access

Chapter 3. Modeling Languages

Abstract
Modeling languages determine the concepts that can be used to describe an extract from perceived reality and how these concepts can be put into mutual relationship. Modeling languages thus provide the vocabulary and the grammar needed to represent real-life situations in models. They will subsequently be considered in a structured way.
Albert Fleischmann, Stefan Oppl, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary

Open Access

Chapter 4. Contemporary Challenges in Business Process Modeling / Management

Abstract
In the previous chapters we have considered the means for describing the sequence of activities executed in a process. In the course of digitalization, processes in an organization and, in particular across organizations, are becoming more complex. In order to describe them nonetheless in a transparent way, it is necessary to organize them as networks of processes, or as a hierarchy of subprocesses.
Albert Fleischmann, Stefan Oppl, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary

Open Access

Chapter 5. From Modeling To Digitalization

Abstract
In the previous chapters, we have shown that what happens in organizations (companies, administrations, etc.) is based on models from various disciplines. Business models, which represent enterprise architectures with models for products and services, organizational structure, processes, data and IT infrastructure, describe in which area a company does business, how it does this, which exchange relationships it has with partners, which technical infrastructure it is supported by, etc.
Albert Fleischmann, Stefan Oppl, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary

Open Access

Chapter 6. Preparation of Process Implementation

Abstract
The aim of the process preparation in the sense of a subsequent implementation is a precise description of the process with a description of the process strategy and process logic. The preparation includes the activity bundles on the left side of the open cycle, i.e., analysis, modeling, validation and optimization (see figure below). The result of these activity bundles is a process description that is sufficiently precise for implementation. The preparation is split into the activities analysis combined with modeling, validation, and optimization. These activities are not carried out in a strict order, but rather the respective priorities can change frequently between activities. Figure 6.1 shows these various activities and their relationships
Albert Fleischmann, Stefan Oppl, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary

Open Access

Chapter 7. Realization

Abstract
With the specification of effective and efficient processes, the foundation for their implementation has been laid. Following these preparatory activities, we now deal with the implementation of process specifications in an execution environment and the handling of process instances in live operation. The implementation of a process specification as an executable process comprises the activity bundles organizational implementation, IT implementation and operation including monitoring. Figure 7.1 shows the classification of these activities in the process management model.
Albert Fleischmann, Stefan Oppl, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary

Open Access

Chapter 8. Industrial Use Case

Abstract
The following case study shows how some of the previously described BPM concepts, methods and languages were used to improve a core process of a company. On the basis of the individual aspects of the open BPM cycle their instantiation and intertwining will be demonstrated as occurring in a real industrial development project. In the following, the course of the project is described in a structured way. The respective activities of the bundle of activities in Figure 8.1 are noted in the margin of the use case description. The activities of each activity bundle are not only carried out with a high degree of overlap, there are also frequent shifts with respect to the considered focus throughout the project.
Albert Fleischmann, Stefan Oppl, Werner Schmidt, Christian Stary

Backmatter

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