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Über dieses Buch

This book tells the story of the EU Global Strategy (EUGS). By reflecting back on the 2003 European Security Strategy, this book uncovers the background, the process, the content and the follow-up of the EUGS thirteen years later. By framing the EUGS in this broader context, this book is essential for anyone wishing to understand European foreign policy. The author, who drafted the EUGS on behalf of High Representative and Vice President of the Commission (HRVP) Federica Mogherini, uses the lens of the EUGS to provide a broader narrative of the EU and its functioning. Tocci’s hybrid role as a scholar and adviser has given her unique access to and knowledge of a wide range of complex structures and actors, all the while remaining sufficiently detached from official processes to retain an observer’s eye. This book reflects this hybrid nature: while written by and for scholars, it is not a classic scholarly work, but will appeal to anyone wishing to learn more about the EUGS and European foreign policy more broadly.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
The brief introduction explains the context, rationale and structure of this book. In view of the author’s role as the lead drafter of the EU Global Strategy on behalf of the EU High Representative of Foreign Affairs and Security Policy/Vice-President of the European Commission Federica Mogherini, but also as a scholar based in the Institute for International affairs in Rome, the introduction emphasises the unique character and contribution of this book to the broader literature on European foreign policy.
Nathalie Tocci

Chapter 2. Why Have a Strategy?

Abstract
Chapter 2 addresses the politics underpinning a strategy: the “why” of strategy-making. Why does an international actor like the European Union produce a strategy? It begins by assessing the political motivations behind the 2003 European Security Strategy, which was deeply shaped by the scarring experience of the war in Iraq and the intra-European and transatlantic divisions that it sowed. It then addresses the political context of the EU in 2015–2016 when the EU Global Strategy was developed. In the case of the EUGS, political unity was one of the rationales for strategy-making, as it had been back in 2003. But alongside this, the EUGS also sought to provide a sense of policy direction and to join up institutions and players in the EU foreign policy machinery so as to increase the effectiveness of external action.
Nathalie Tocci

Chapter 3. How to Make a Strategy?

Abstract
This chapter addresses the “how” question in strategy-making. How is a strategy produced and how has the EU gone about it? It begins by reviewing the methods used both in the production of the 2003 ESS as well as in its 2008 sequel: the Implementation Report on the ESS. It extrapolates the lessons learned from these two exercises and how these were applied when developing the EU Global Strategy 13 years later. Much like in 2003, a novel method had to be developed so as it ensure that the document produced would be coherent and fairly concise. But unlike 2003, a much wider and deeper process of consultation was necessary precisely in view of the difficult predicament the Union is in.
Nathalie Tocci

Chapter 4. What Is a Strategy?

Abstract
This chapter distils the “what”: what were the main messages of the 2003 ESS and how do these relate to the key points of the 2016 EUGS? It dissects the EUGS analysing not simply the content, its meaning and implications for the EU, but perhaps more importantly the debates underpinning each choice made in the Strategy itself, be these between the Member States, between and within EU institutions, or amongst the European foreign policy community as a whole.
Nathalie Tocci

Chapter 5. What Next After a Strategy?

Abstract
What comes after a Strategy is published? The European Security Strategy was not, according to its own drafters, a Strategy: it outlined the goals but said little about the means to achieve them. In many respects, it can be described as a strategic concept, rather than as a strategy proper. As such, little deliberate action followed as the implementation of the ESS. While this was a choice that fully reflected the needs of the EU at the time, 13 years later, the concurrence of crises within and beyond the Union made a focus on implementation essential. This chapter discusses the main areas of implementation of the EUGS, explaining why, in the aftermath of the Brexit vote, security and defence has become one of the main areas of focus for the EU’s external action.
Nathalie Tocci

Backmatter

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