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Über dieses Buch

This book is based on a 1981 German language edition published by Springer­ Verlag, Vienna, under the title Bioprozesstechnik. Philip Manor has done the translation, for which I am deeply grateful. This book differs from the German edition in many ways besides language. It is substantially enlargened and updated, and examples of computer simula­ tions have been added together with other appendices to make the work both more comprehensive and more practical. This book is the result of over 15 years of experience in teaching and research. It stems from lectures that I began in 1970 at the Technical University of Graz, Austria, and continued at the University of Western Ontario in London, Canada, 1980; at the Free University of Brussels, 1981; at Chalmers Technical University in G6teborg, Sweden; at the Academy of Sciences in lena, East Germany; at the "Haus der Technik" in Essen, West Germany, 1982; at the Academy of Science in Sofia, Bulgaria; and at the Technical University of Delft, Netherlands, 1986. The main goals of this book are, first, to bridge the gap that always exists between basic principles and applied engineering practice, second, to enhance the integration between biological and physical phenomena, and, third, to contribute to the internal development of the field of biotechnology by describing the process-oriented field of bioprocess technology.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
In a general sense, biotechnology is a multi- and interdisciplinary field of activities dealing with biological and biochemical processes carried out on a broad range of scale (10 1 to 106 m3) as a technique for production.
Anton Moser

Chapter 2. The Principles of Bioprocess Technology

Abstract
Chapter 1 mentioned the central importance of the catalyst in biotechnological processes. A culture suitable for production purposes—that is, a cell culture with sufficiently high population density and capacity for economic production of the product—must be available.
Anton Moser

Chapter 3. Bioreactors

Abstract
Bioreactors exist to “tame” biological systems on an industrial scale (see fig. 1.1), and they should present the optimum conditions for serving the needs of biological processes. A large number of reactor types are found corresponding to the large number of different industrial processes (e.g., Moo-Young, 1985; e.g. Rehm and Reed 1982ff). Reviews with detailed discussions are to be found in the literature and also in almost all symposium volumes on biotechnology (Atkinson, 1974; Atkinson and Kossen, 1978; Fiechter, 1978; Ghose and Mukhopadhyay, 1979; Moo-Young, 1985; Mosen 1985a; Schügerl,1979,1980; Sittig, 1977; Sittig and Heine, 1977). Here some of the most important types will be briefly mentioned.
Anton Moser

Chapter 4. Process Kinetic Analysis

Abstract
A schematic diagram for a homogeneous biological process was shown in Fig. 2.3. For comparison, Fig. 4.1 shows a typical situation in a heterogeneous system; in it a rotating disk binds a microbiological film. In analogy to Fig. 2.3, all significant process variables in the three reaction phases (gas, liquid, and solid) are shown along with the limiting transport steps, in the order 1 to 4.
Anton Moser

Chapter 5. Bioprocess Kinetics

Abstract
Model building is considered here as an adaptive process (cf. Fig. 2.18): It involves stepwise fitting of the parameters, k, and discrimination of the function, f, itself. All of the models in this chapter should be considered as working hypotheses. The nature of formal kinetic descriptions means that other mathematical functions can always be found that serve the same descriptive function to within the precision of the measurements (see Esener et al., 1983). The lack of basic content in formal kinetic models in comparison with structured models (Harder and Roels, 1981; Roels and Kossen, 1978) can to some extent be compensated for by subsequent analysis (Esener et al., 1983; A. Moser, 1978b, 1984a).
Anton Moser

Chapter 6. Bioreactor Performance: Process Design Methods

Abstract
Bioprocess design, as suggested in Fig. 2.14 (including especially calculation of the conversion for prediction of the mode of reactor operation that will lead to optimal production), represents the stage where kinetic and bioreactor data are integrated. In practical situations, the dominant problems are often maintenance of sterility, improvement in the strain of microorganism, and isolation of the product. All of these greatly affect economic considerations. Once in operation, a plant using a stirred vessel can usually be modified only with respect to the operating conditions: Changing to a different type of reactor is not an option. In the planning of a new operation, selection of both the optimal mode of operation and the optimal reactor type is a foremost consideration. Selection will be even more important in the future, when large volume/low priced processes become economically competitive (cf. Fig. 1.2).
Anton Moser

Backmatter

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