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Über dieses Buch

This book focuses on a new type of inclusive consumer decision-making process model (CDM) related to new leading-edge consumers. There have been two main types of CDMs for consumer behavior: one is the stimulus–response model and the other is the information-processing model. The stimulus–response model is applicable when consumers buy low-involvement products, and the information-processing model applies for high-involvement products. Thus consumers’ decision making depends on the involvement level for the products.

With the advent of the widespread use of the Internet, however, the situation has changed. Consumers whose information sensitivity is high (i.e., among leading-edge consumers) now use the Internet to search for information even for low-involvement products. The consumers’ decision-making process depends therefore on their information sensitivity, not on the involvement level of the products. Also, these leading-edge consumers become in effect another type of media as they broaden their experience through the Internet.

Under these circumstances, research about leading-edge consumers and the introduction of a new CDM is highly significant. This book gathers data about leading-edge consumers, analyzes these data, then proposes a new type of CDM called “circulation marketing”. Following this model, not only the previous types of CDM, but also the new kind of CDM, including share behavior of leading-edge consumers, is explained.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Japanese Consumers and Media Usage

Abstract
The environment in which we live, particularly the way we access the media and obtain information, has changed considerably since the advent of the Internet. It is quite evident that this environmental change could significantly affect the formulation of marketing strategies in terms of targeting consumers and their behaviors. Using various types of data, this chapter will explain the facts associated with and changes in the way Japanese consumers access the media.
Akira Shimizu

Chapter 2. Evolution of the Comprehensive Decision-Making Process: Emergence of Outspoken Consumers

Abstract
How you profile your target consumers is extremely important when it comes to a marketing strategy. In economics, some theories regard consumers as “homo economicus” and assume that consumers who are advantaged or in an economically advantageous position would purchase expensive products.
Akira Shimizu

Chapter 3. Measuring the Impact of a Blog: Quantitative and Qualitative Aspects

Abstract
In Chap. 1, it was elucidated that SNS is often used by young people at the time of a product purchase. Using real data, Chap. 2 demonstrated that there are some pioneering conceptual models of information communication that consider the effect of SNS in Japan and these concepts are valid. The marketing and science research group sponsored by the Japan Marketing Association (JMA) measured the effect of blogs quantitatively as well as qualitatively over two years, that is, FY2006 and FY2007. Given that SNS consisted mainly of blogs prior to the emergence of Twitter and Facebook, measuring its effect is significant even today when it comes to reviewing the role of SNS. In this chapter, literature related to the Internet will be reviewed and the effect that the quality and quantity of blog posts have on purchasing will be checked using the data from this study group.
Akira Shimizu

Chapter 4. Studies on Commitment

Abstract
In this chapter, the concept of commitment and its practical applications are considered. Commitments can be categorized into several categories based on the source; however, brand commitment, which is a concept related to satisfaction with and passion for the brand after making a purchase, as described in Chap. 2, is discussed in this chapter. In this chapter, purchasing products sold at supermarkets is taken as an example and the role played by commitment is discussed.
Akira Shimizu

Chapter 5. Mechanism of Attitude Formation for Consumers Who Convey Information

Abstract
Based on the discussions in Chaps. 1 to 4, we were able to confirm that individuals who were highly satisfied with the product they purchased are likely to spread the word after the purchase, just as suggested in previous studies. However, the discussions also showed that the level of satisfaction alone cannot explain the behavior.
Akira Shimizu

Chapter 6. Emergence of Communication-Oriented Consumers

Abstract
The digital divide among Japanese consumers is growing as shown in Chap. 1. Chap. 2 logically and empirically confirmed that the most up-to-date consumers spread the word about their experiences with a product or service. Chapter 3 demonstrated that they are especially likely to spread the word when they recognized and took interest in a product or service, collected information, and then became satisfied with what they purchased.
Akira Shimizu

Chapter 7. Research on Uncertain Listeners

Abstract
In Chap. 6, I used two scales to show that the brand segmentation is significant: (1) consumers’ information sensitivity and (2) consumers’ affective commitment to the relevant product.
Akira Shimizu

Chapter 8. Studies on Connoisseurs

Abstract
As outlined in Chaps. 6 and 7, it has become clear that a brand can be assessed based on the purchase activities of information-savvy consumers. In this chapter, I will go a step further and consider forecasting the demand for new products by surveying such information-savvy consumers. Given that it was possible to assess a brand based on the purchase behaviors of information-savvy consumers, the ultimate aim is to develop a system that provides feedback for product development by surveying them in detail, and even understanding the reasons why they recognize particular brands.
Akira Shimizu

Chapter 9. Brand Rating in the Age of Information Sharing

Abstract
Based on discussions thus far, it has become evident that the development of the Internet has had a great impact on consumer behavior and marketing strategies related to it. In particular, it has become clear that information plays an important role in generating innovative ideas for segmentation—which is a basis of marketing strategy—just like traditional demographic and lifestyle factors. You have to examine the process that includes post-purchase information sharing when considering consumers’ decision-making process.
Akira Shimizu

Chapter 10. A New Decision-Making Process—A Circulating-Type Communications Model

Abstract
We can summarize the relationships between consumer behavior and marketing strategy in the history of research into two broad areas: research into segmentation and research into the consumer decision-making process. Segmentation is important in a marketing strategy as the pre-stage when determining the targets and thinking about positioning.
Akira Shimizu

Backmatter

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