Skip to main content
main-content

Tipp

Weitere Artikel dieser Ausgabe durch Wischen aufrufen

01.06.2015 | Review Essay | Ausgabe 3/2015

Society 3/2015

The Legacies of Westphalia

Zeitschrift:
Society > Ausgabe 3/2015
Autor:
Collin May

Abstract

With new international challenges facing the globe from the Ukraine to the Middle East to the South China Sea, two of the West’s most respected authors on international relations argue that the principles of Westphalia are still as relevant as ever. While the context may be different, and the roles of an ambivalent United States and Europe may be uncertain, the balance of power and the nation-state model remain operative. This review of recent works by Henry Kissinger and Robert Kaplan make the case for Westphalian principles on a worldwide scale.

Bitte loggen Sie sich ein, um Zugang zu diesem Inhalt zu erhalten

Sie möchten Zugang zu diesem Inhalt erhalten? Dann informieren Sie sich jetzt über unsere Produkte:

Springer Professional "Wirtschaft+Technik"

Online-Abonnement

Mit Springer Professional "Wirtschaft+Technik" erhalten Sie Zugriff auf:

  • über 69.000 Bücher
  • über 500 Zeitschriften

aus folgenden Fachgebieten:

  • Automobil + Motoren
  • Bauwesen + Immobilien
  • Business IT + Informatik
  • Elektrotechnik + Elektronik
  • Energie + Umwelt
  • Finance + Banking
  • Management + Führung
  • Marketing + Vertrieb
  • Maschinenbau + Werkstoffe
  • Versicherung + Risiko

Testen Sie jetzt 30 Tage kostenlos.

Springer Professional "Wirtschaft"

Online-Abonnement

Mit Springer Professional "Wirtschaft" erhalten Sie Zugriff auf:

  • über 58.000 Bücher
  • über 300 Zeitschriften

aus folgenden Fachgebieten:

  • Bauwesen + Immobilien
  • Business IT + Informatik
  • Finance + Banking
  • Management + Führung
  • Marketing + Vertrieb
  • Versicherung + Risiko




Testen Sie jetzt 30 Tage kostenlos.

Über diesen Artikel

Weitere Artikel der Ausgabe 3/2015

Society 3/2015 Zur Ausgabe

Commentary: Calderwood Prize Essay in Public Writing

Agnost-a-What?

Social Science and Public Policy

Righting Congress by Writing Congress