Skip to main content
main-content

Tipp

Weitere Artikel dieser Ausgabe durch Wischen aufrufen

17.10.2016 | Review Paper | Ausgabe 1/2017

Biodiversity and Conservation 1/2017

The Capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus): an iconic focal species for knowledge-based integrative management and conservation of Baltic forests

Zeitschrift:
Biodiversity and Conservation > Ausgabe 1/2017
Autoren:
Asko Lõhmus, Meelis Leivits, Elmārs Pēterhofs, Rytis Zizas, Helmuts Hofmanis, Ivar Ojaste, Petras Kurlavičius
Wichtige Hinweise
Communicated by Matts Lindbladh.

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi:10.​1007/​s10531-016-1223-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
This article belongs to the Topical Collection: Forest and plantation biodiversity.

Abstract

Biodiversity loss was a central argument for redefining sustainable forest management in the 1990s, but threatened species remain poorly addressed in forestry governance. Management history of the Capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus) population in the Baltic States reveals a high potential of socially valued threatened species for developing the missing forestry–conservation interfaces. We review the history of the Baltic Capercaillie population since the 19th century, showing how its status transformed, both ecologically and socially, from a famous hunting target to the most widely protected forest species in the region. Compilation of recent national survey data confirms that at least 3450 lekking males currently survive in 961 leks; they are distributed between six large and about twenty small populations. During the 20th century, lek sizes decreased and local extirpations spread from South-Baltic mosaic lands to northern forests. As a social response, innovative management initiatives have repeatedly enabled periods of population stability and local recoveries. The most recent developments in Capercaillie conservation combine elements from the historically separated nature conservation, forestry and game-management approaches. The consistency of such social responses despite political upheavals suggests that iconic species can culturally stabilize long-term sustainable development.

Bitte loggen Sie sich ein, um Zugang zu diesem Inhalt zu erhalten

Sie möchten Zugang zu diesem Inhalt erhalten? Dann informieren Sie sich jetzt über unsere Produkte:

Springer Professional "Wirtschaft+Technik"

Online-Abonnement

Mit Springer Professional "Wirtschaft+Technik" erhalten Sie Zugriff auf:

  • über 69.000 Bücher
  • über 500 Zeitschriften

aus folgenden Fachgebieten:

  • Automobil + Motoren
  • Bauwesen + Immobilien
  • Business IT + Informatik
  • Elektrotechnik + Elektronik
  • Energie + Umwelt
  • Finance + Banking
  • Management + Führung
  • Marketing + Vertrieb
  • Maschinenbau + Werkstoffe
  • Versicherung + Risiko

Testen Sie jetzt 30 Tage kostenlos.

Springer Professional "Technik"

Online-Abonnement

Mit Springer Professional "Technik" erhalten Sie Zugriff auf:

  • über 50.000 Bücher
  • über 380 Zeitschriften

aus folgenden Fachgebieten:

  • Automobil + Motoren
  • Bauwesen + Immobilien
  • Business IT + Informatik
  • Elektrotechnik + Elektronik
  • Energie + Umwelt
  • Maschinenbau + Werkstoffe




Testen Sie jetzt 30 Tage kostenlos.

Zusatzmaterial
Nur für berechtigte Nutzer zugänglich
Literatur
Über diesen Artikel

Weitere Artikel der Ausgabe 1/2017

Biodiversity and Conservation 1/2017 Zur Ausgabe